TESTIMONIAL. “Policeman, I adopted the abused girl I had rescued”

It all started one night in March 2018. That night, Police Sergeant Brian Zach, 49, patrolled the streets of Kingman, Arizona, when a call took him to an apartment over a domestic violence case. The victim is a 2 year old girl, Kaila. While the little victim is placed in Brian’s custody, the parents are taken to the police station for questioning. Their daughter’s injuries do not match their statements. Child protection services inform police that this is the third report concerning this child.

Little Kaila is entrusted to Brian and that night the sergeant spends five hours with the bruised girl. She doesn’t utter a single word, but her actions speak for her. “She grabbed my hand and put it on her lap. We did some coloring, nibbled on a bite and watched the Ralph Lauren cartoon.” When Kaila is finally transferred to a specialist hospital to treat her injuries, Brian returns home.

In the United States, fictitious parentage allows social services to place children with close friends

Upset by this meeting, he finds his wife, Cierra, and his two older teenagers. As the days go by, he regularly checks in on the child, happy to know that she is recovering well from her injuries. He also follows the progress of the case and learns that no member of Kaila’s extended family is able to accommodate him. The idea then arises in the head of the policeman: and why not welcome the child at his home? ”

While awaiting a court decision, the children are placed with a foster family. In our case, the relationship formed during his rescue was used to establish what is called “fictitious parentage,” “Brian explains. In the United States, fictitious kinship allows social services to place children with friends. relatives, rather than a related person. ” As soon as I opened the car door that dropped Kaila off at our house, her face lit up, he recalls. Kaila reached out to me and she didn’t leave it. ”

“One day, back from school, she called me ‘daddy’ for the first time”

Aged 2 and a half, the little one is very late in learning and the family immediately enrolls her in kindergarten. “Today, Kaila is a real pipelette but, when she arrived, she knew only three words. She could not really speak and, to express herself, she growled like a caveman, recalls Brian moved. , she called me “dude” for a week or two, then “Brian.” And one day, coming back from school, she called me “daddy” for the first time.

“Kaila’s departure would have devastated us” Brian, his wife and their two grown children quickly understood.

Brian, his wife, Cierra, and their two children, Raina, 19, and Trevin, 17, know they need to restrain the expression of their affection. “We were obviously attached. We knew that his departure, still possible at the time, would have devastated us …” But justice gives them reason to hope. The judge tells them that Kaila’s parents have lost their parental authority and that no one has offered to take care of her.

“We have decided to make a commitment to give this child a loving family, our own.” The little girl was adopted in full on August 18, 2020 by Brian’s family. Kaila is officially their child. “When the judge said, basically, ‘Congratulations,’ I let out a huge sigh of relief knowing that I will never have to worry about her again, Brian concludes. She will always be with us, loved and loved. pampered. She deserves it so much. ”

Brian Zach © COURTESY OF BRIAN ZACH

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Emily
Emily
Passionate about people news, I transcribe on this site the best scoops of our beloved personalities. Follow us on the social networks so you don't miss anything. XOXO

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